Episode 3 – Circular Economy and the Electric Vehicle Charge Point (EVCP)

Transcript:

Hello everyone. Welcome to my podcast Civils Bites. My name is Charlie, I am your host for quick, distilled, and discussed civil engineering and cost management matters. Today’s topic will cover Circular Economy.

Here we go.

In this series, I would like to talk about civil engineering, circular economy, cost management, whole life cycle costing, and other technical topics in the best way.

In this episode, I would like to discuss Circular Economy and the Electric Vehicle Charge Point (EVCP) and Infrastructure in a very simple and clear way so that everyone can understand it without any difficulty.

So

let’s get started

Cost Management, Circular Economy, Whole Life Cycle Costing, Civil Engineering, Enabling Works, Pragmatic Approach, Electric Vehicle Charge Point (EVCP)
Cost Management, Circular Economy, Whole Life Cycle Costing, Civil Engineering, Enabling Works, Pragmatic Approach, Electric Vehicle Charge Point (EVCP)

Firstly,

What is a Circular Economy?

Raw natural resources are collected, turned into products, and then discarded in the linear economy. A circular economy model, on the other hand, tries to bridge the gap between production and the natural ecosystems’ cycles, which humans ultimately rely on.

On the one hand, this involves reducing waste by composting biodegradable trash or reusing, remanufacturing, and lastly recycling transformed and non-biodegradable waste. On the other hand, it also entails eliminating the usage of chemical chemicals (as a means of aiding natural system regeneration) and relying on renewable energy.

Cost Management, Circular Economy, Whole Life Cycle Costing, Civil Engineering, Enabling Works, Pragmatic Approach, Electric Vehicle Charge Point (EVCP)
Cost Management, Circular Economy, Whole Life Cycle Costing, Civil Engineering, Enabling Works, Pragmatic Approach, Electric Vehicle Charge Point (EVCP)

That is the simple definition of the circular economy. let’s go through the further explanation and definition of it by large forums and organizations.

the World Economic Forum defines it as,

“By design, a circular economy is an industrial system that is restorative or regenerative.”

World Economic Forum

It aims to eliminate waste through the superior design of materials, products, systems, and business models, replacing the end-of-life concept with restoration, shifting toward the use of renewable energy, eliminating the use of toxic chemicals that impede reuse and return to the biosphere, and eliminating waste through the superior design of materials, products, systems, and business models.

and lastly, the definition of circular economy defined by the Ellen McArthur Foundation is:

“A circular economy seeks to redefine growth by focusing on positive societal benefits rather than the present take-make-dispose extractive industrial model.” It entails gradually decoupling economic activity from finite resource consumption and eliminating waste from the system. The circular model, which is underpinned by a shift to renewable energy sources, creates economic, natural, and social capital. It is founded on three principles: eliminate waste and pollution, keep products and materials in use, and restore natural systems.”

Ellen McArthur Foundation

These are the simpler definitions of a circular economy where both foundations have defined it in their terms.

Cost Management, Circular Economy, Whole Life Cycle Costing, Civil Engineering, Enabling Works, Pragmatic Approach, Electric Vehicle Charge Point (EVCP)
Cost Management, Circular Economy, Whole Life Cycle Costing, Civil Engineering, Enabling Works, Pragmatic Approach, Electric Vehicle Charge Point (EVCP)

Now let’s jump onto the benefits of a circular economy.

Humankind has followed a linear model of production and consumption since the Industrial Revolution. Raw resources have been processed into things, which are then sold, consumed, and eventually discarded and managed.

The circular economy, on the other hand, is an industrial model that is regenerative by intention and design, with the goal of improving resource performance and combating the volatility that climate change may bring to businesses. It offers operational and strategic benefits, and it brings together a vast potential for value creation across the economic, commercial, environmental, and social realms.

  • Fewer Greenhouse Gas Emissions

One of the circular economy’s goals is to have a positive impact on the planet’s ecosystems while also combating the over-exploitation of natural resources. The circular economy has the potential to lower carbon emissions.

  • Healthy and Resilient Soils

The principles of the circular economy in the farming system ensure that critical nutrients are returned to the soil via anaerobic processes or composting, softening the impact of land exploitation and natural ecosystems.

Furthermore, given that soil degradation costs the global economy an estimated $40 billion per year and has hidden costs such as increased fertilizer use, loss of biodiversity, and loss of unique landscapes, a circular economy could be extremely beneficial to both the soils and the economy.

  • Increased Potential for Economic Growth

Decoupling economic growth from resource usage is critical. According to a McKinsey analysis, the increase in revenue from new circular activities, along with lower production costs by making items and materials more functional and readily disassembled and reused, has the potential to boost GDP and thus economic growth.

There are enormous positive impacts of a circular economy worldwide and given its potential, it can change the world.

There are some Institutional barriers to a Circular Economy Model, financial, structural, operational, attitudinal, and technological impediments to switching to a circular economy model, according to a Swedish study done in 2017 that intended to incorporate multiple perspectives on the problem.


Cost Management, Circular Economy, Whole Life Cycle Costing, Civil Engineering, Enabling Works, Pragmatic Approach, Electric Vehicle Charge Point (EVCP)
Cost Management, Circular Economy, Whole Life Cycle Costing, Civil Engineering, Enabling Works, Pragmatic Approach, Electric Vehicle Charge Point (EVCP)

Now let’s talk about Electric Vehicles Charging Hub infrastructure.

A charging station, also known as an EV charger or electric vehicle Charge Point (EVCP), is a piece of equipment used to charge plug-in electric automobiles including hybrids, neighbourhood electric vehicles, trucks, buses, and others.

Although electric vehicles’ batteries can only be charged with DC power, most feature an inbuilt AC-to-DC converter that allows them to be connected to a typical domestic AC electrical receptacle. Low-cost public charging stations, dubbed “AC charging stations,” will also deliver AC power.

To allow for higher power charging, which necessitates considerably larger AC-to-DC converters, the converter is incorporated into the charging station rather than the car, and the station delivers already-converted DC power to the vehicle directly, bypassing the vehicle’s onboard converter. “DC charging stations” are what they’re called. Most completely electric vehicle types can run on both AC and DC power.

As the countries across the world have been trying to shift from petroleum and diesel cars to electric cars. Being a citizen of the UK let’s talk about our country, where are we in this race, and what are our contributions.

Our prime minister said that all new petrol and diesel vehicles and vans would be phased out by 2030, putting the UK on track to be the fastest nation in the G7 to decarbonize road transport.

Boris Johnson PM
Cost Management, Circular Economy, Whole Life Cycle Costing, Civil Engineering, Enabling Works, Pragmatic Approach, Electric Vehicle Charge Point (EVCP)
Cost Management, Circular Economy, Whole Life Cycle Costing, Civil Engineering, Enabling Works, Pragmatic Approach, Electric Vehicle Charge Point (EVCP)

The industry has also embraced the transition to green road transportation wholeheartedly. Mini, Vauxhall, Ford, Bentley, Rolls Royce, and other manufacturers have committed to a zero-emission future by 2030 by March 2022, and more than £3 billion has been invested in the UK zero-emission vehicle sector.

In the United Kingdom, 190,000 battery-powered electric vehicles (EVs) have been sold in 2021. This was more than the previous five years combined, accounting for nearly one-eighth of all new car sales. It will be even more so this year.

EVs are becoming more affordable to purchase and operate, with many capable of traveling over 200 miles on a single charge, which compares well to ordinary daily automobile use. In 2019, the typical automobile journey in England was 7-8 miles in the city and around 10 miles in the countryside. It’s never been easier to own and operate an electric vehicle. We are now concentrating on establishing a reliable, equitable, and scalable charging network that will cover the entire country.

They must also be implemented where they are most needed around the country. The government’s responsibility is to lay the groundwork for a fair nationwide charging system, removing roadblocks along the way.

We currently have one of Europe’s greatest quick charging networks; according to a report from 2020, we have more rapid chargers per 100 miles of a vital strategic route than any other European country.

By 2035, our £950 million quick charging fund will have funded the installation of at least 6,000 high-powered charge points on England’s motorways and main A-roads.

We’ll also provide over £500 million in subsidies to local governments to assist them to find new methods to expand local Charge Point coverage.

Cost Management, Circular Economy, Whole Life Cycle Costing, Civil Engineering, Enabling Works, Pragmatic Approach, Electric Vehicle Charge Point (EVCP)
Cost Management, Circular Economy, Whole Life Cycle Costing, Civil Engineering, Enabling Works, Pragmatic Approach, Electric Vehicle Charge Point (EVCP)

However, the government is only one component of the answer. The private sector has a key role to play in ensuring that everyone has access to quick, inexpensive, and dependable charging. We’re already seeing a rise in public Electric Vehicle Charge Point (EVCP) stations at supermarkets, gyms, and tourist attractions that aren’t subsidized by the government.

Our goal is to fully integrate charging with our smart energy system, resulting in grid benefits as well as the possibility of lower cost, or even negative, electricity prices for those that charge flexibly.

Our plans will get more charge points in the ground, quicker.

Most UK motorists have access to off-street parking, thus charging generally begins at home. Home-charging not only gives you access to lower electricity prices but also ensures that your car is charged every morning and ready to go for the day.

EV drivers will be able to plug in and charge everywhere, whether on the street where they live, where they shop, or enroute to their destination, thanks to the development of a world-class charging network. This isn’t going to happen overnight, and there will be setbacks along the way. However, the advantages of zero-emission mobility will be seen everywhere, with improved air quality in our cities, economic growth in our automotive sector, and, ultimately, cheaper, and cleaner driving for all.

in the end, I hope you enjoyed and learned a lot in this episode of the podcast. thank you all.

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