Electric Vehicle Charging Point (EVCP) Strategy

Electric Vehicle Charging Point (EVCP)

Cost Management, Circular Economy, Whole Life Cycle Costing, Civil Engineering, Enabling Works, Pragmatic Approach, Electric Vehicle Charge Point (EVCP)
Cost Management, Circular Economy, Whole Life Cycle Costing, Civil Engineering, Enabling Works, Pragmatic Approach, Electric Vehicle Charge Point (EVCP)

Introduction

Local Authorities can employ planning and associated rules to guarantee that electric car charging stations are incorporated into new developments at the planning stage. As a result, charge points are more easily accessible, less costly, and less disruptive than if they were installed later. Electric vehicle (E.V.) uptake can only be stimulated by providing a high-quality network of charge points at residences and other frequented parking locations. The government is anticipated to implement national rules for ChargePoint provision in England through building regulations in the future years, depending on the results of a recent survey. Both Scotland and Wales are expected to follow suit.

In some cases, local authorities may desire to modify their local planning regulations or guidelines for developers sooner or set more ambitious or comprehensive parking and design criteria specific to local circumstances. Aside from other local government measures to reduce reliance on private automobiles, improve air quality, enhance the usage of public transportation, and promote car-pooling and walking and bicycling, the inclusion of charge points in planning regulations should be considered. There may also be considerations of housing availability, climate change and transportation, and broader urban development and rejuvenation initiatives when formulating E.V. planning rules or a comprehensive E.V. strategy. To prepare for a possible shift to electric vehicles, the U.K. government said in February 2020 that it intends to phase out the sale of all types of internal combustion engines, including gasoline and diesel, by 2035. They can estimate demand for charging stations and, thus, inform policy changes and the construction of more charging stations

The projected growth of electric car use in the United Kingdom

To bring forward the end of sales of new petrol and diesel vehicles from 2040, or earlier if a quicker transition becomes viable, the U.K. Government revealed proposals in February 2020 that included hybrid vehicles for the first time after a consultation process (H.M. Government, 2020). The Road to Zero (H.M. Government, 2018), published by the U.K. government in July 2018, set a 2040 deadline to end conventional petrol and diesel vehicle sales. If the 2035 objective is met, the Energy Saving Trust has predicted how many electric cars may be in the U.K. Figure 1 shows that between 15.6 million and 19.4 million electric vehicles might be on the road in the U.K. in 2035. The total number of vehicles in the U.K. in 2019 (the most current figure) was 32 million (H.M. Government, 2019). The adoption of electric vehicles in the United Kingdom is not expected to be uniform. Smaller or sparser populations, lack of public transportation, economic wealth, land availability for electric vehicle infrastructure, local political interest in E.V.s and the level of local incentives for E.V. users may cause certain locations to lag behind others. Local governments may leverage these elements to speed up the adoption of electric vehicles in their jurisdictions.

 

 

Cost Management, Circular Economy, Whole Life Cycle Costing, Civil Engineering, Enabling Works, Pragmatic Approach, Electric Vehicle Charge Point (EVCP)
Cost Management, Circular Economy, Whole Life Cycle Costing, Civil Engineering, Enabling Works, Pragmatic Approach, Electric Vehicle Charge Point (EVCP)

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